Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health

Document Type: Editorial

Author

Department of Public Administration and Policy, American University, Washington, DC, USA

Abstract

A number of individuals and organizations have considerable influence over the selection of global health priorities and strategies. For some that influence derives from control over financial resources. For others it comes from expertise and claims to moral authority—what can be termed, respectively, epistemic and normative power. In contrast to financial power, we commonly take for granted that epistemic and normative forms of power are legitimate. I argue that we should not; rather we should investigate the origins of these forms of power, and consider under what circumstances they are justly derived.

Highlights

Commentaries Published on this Paper

  • Knowledge, Politics and Power in Global Health; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • The Politics of Researching Global Health Politics; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • Powerful Concepts in Global Health; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • Knowledge and Networks – Key Sources of Power in Global Health; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • Revealing Power in Truth; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • Power and Priorities: The Growing Pains of Global Health; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • Your Call Could not be Completed as Dialled: Why Truth Does not Speak to Power In Global Health; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

  • Power in Global Health Agenda-Setting: The Role of Private Funding; Comment on “Knowledge, Moral Claims and the Exercise of Power in Global Health”

            Abstract | PDF

 

Author’s Response to the Commentaries

  • Global Health as a Field of Power Relations: A Response to Recent Commentaries

            Abstract | PDF

Keywords

Main Subjects


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