Single Versus Multi-Faceted Implementation Strategies – Is There a Simple Answer to a Complex Question? A Response to Recent Commentaries and a Call to Action for Implementation Practitioners and Researchers

Document Type: Correspondence

Authors

1 School of Nursing, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia

2 Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

Keywords

Main Subjects


We are increasingly aware of the need to be as effective and efficient as possible when designing and applying strategies to implement evidenceinformed changes into policy and practice, particularly within our resource constrained health systems. Implementation efforts consume a range of resources, including time, people, educational input, and communication systems to name just a few... (Read more...)

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