Of Politicians and Technocrats, and Why Global Health Scholars Are Inevitably a Bit of Both: A Response to Recent Commentaries

Document Type: Correspondence

Author

Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany

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Main Subjects


When I wrote “Navigating Between Stealth Advocacy and Unconscious Dogmatism: The Challenge of Researching the Norms, Politics and Power of Global Health,”1 my primary intention was to fuel the interdisciplinary dialogue on norms, politics, and power that had been started in this journal by others. Considering the five insightful comments,2-6 responding to my article, I think I can claim at least that: the dialogue continues, as it should... (Read more...)

  1. Ooms G. Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health. Int J Health Policy Manag. 2015;4(10):641-644. doi:10.15171/ijhpm.2015.116
  2. Askheim C, Heggen K, Engebretsen E. Politics and power in global health: the constituting role of conflicts: Comment on “Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health.” Int J Health Policy Manag. 2016;5(2):117-119. doi:10.15171/ijhpm.2015.188
  3. Forman L. The ghost is the machine: how can we visibilize the unseen norms and power of global health? Comment on “Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health.” Int J Health Policy Manag. 2016;5(3):197-199. doi:10.15171/ijhpm.2015.206
  4. Kickbusch I. Politics or technocracy – what next for global health? Comment on “Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health.” Int J Health Policy Manag. 2016;5(3):201-204. doi:10.15171/ijhpm.2015.209
  5. Marten R. Global health warning: definitions wield power: Comment on “Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health.” Int J Health Policy Manag. 2016;5(3):207–209. doi:10.15171/ijhpm.2015.213
  6. Hanefeld J. Advancing global health – the need for (better) social science: Comment on: “Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health.” Int J Health Policy Manag. 2016;5(4):279-281. doi:10.15171/ijhpm.2015.213
  7. Timmins N. At last, NICE to take over the Cancer Drugs Fund. BMJ. 2016;352:i1324. doi:10.1136/bmj.i1324
  8. Røttingen JA, Ottersen T, Ablo A, et al. Shared Responsibilities for Health: A Coherent Global Framework for Health Financing. Final Report of the Centre on Global Health Security Working Group on Health Financing. https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/field/field_document/20140521HealthFinancing.pdf
  9. Koplan JP, Bond TC, Merson MH, et al. Towards a common definition of global health. Lancet. 2009;373(9679):1993–1995. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(09)60332-9
  10. Beaglehole R, Bonita R. What is Global Health? Global Health Action. 2010;3:5142.
  11. Ooms G, Rachel H, Decoster K, Van Damme W. Global health: what it has been so far, what it should be, and what it could become. Working paper/syllabus. http://www.itg.be/itg/Uploads/Volksgezondheid/wpshsop/SHSOP%20WP%202%20Ooms%20Global%20Health.pdf