Aid Effectiveness in the Sustainable Development Goals Era; Comment on ““It’s About the Idea Hitting the Bull’s Eye”: How Aid Effectiveness Can Catalyse the Scale-up of Health Innovations”

Document Type: Commentary

Authors

Center for Policy Impact in Global Health, Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, NC, USA

Abstract

Over just a six-year period from 2005-2011, five aid effectiveness initiatives were launched: the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness (2005), the International Health Partnership plus (2007), the Accra Agenda for Action (2008), the Busan Partnership for Effective Cooperation (2011), and the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC) (2011). More recently, in 2015, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA) was signed at the third international conference on financing for development and the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) 2030 Global Compact was signed in 2017. Both documents espouse principles of aid effectiveness and would most likely guide financing decisions in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) era. This is therefore a good moment to assess whether the aid effectiveness agenda made a difference in development and its relevance in the SDG era.

Keywords

Main Subjects


  1. Wickremasinghe D, Gautham M, Umar N, et al. “It’s about the idea hitting the bull’s eye”: how aid effectiveness can catalyse the scale-up of health innovations. Int J Health Policy Manag. 2018;7(8):718-727. doi:10.15171/IJHPM.2018.08
  2. OECD. The Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and the Accra Agenda for Action: 2005/2008. Paris: OECD; 2005/2008. http://www.oecd.org/dac/effectiveness/34428351.pdf.  Accessed
    October 8, 2018.
  3. Shorten T, Taylor M, Spicer N, et al. The International Health Partnership Plus: rhetoric or real change? Results of a self-reported survey in the context of the 4th High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan. Global Health 2012;8:13.
  4. OECD. The Busan Partnership for Effective Development
    Cooperation
    . Paris: OECD; 2012. http://www.oecd.org/dac/effectiveness/Busan%20partnership.pdf.    Accessed October 8, 2018.
  5. Global partnership for effective development cooperation. http://effectivecooperation.org/.  Accessed October 8, 2018.
  6. Keijzer N, Lundsgaarde E. Sustaining the development effectiveness agenda. Copenhagen: Danish Institute for International Studies; 2016.
  7. United Nations. Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development. United Nations; 2015.
  8. United Nations. Doha Declaration on Financing for Development: Outcome Document of the Follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development to Review the Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus. United Nations; 2008.
  9. World Bank Group. What is the Monterrey Consensus?  http://siteresources.worldbank.org/KFDLP/Resources/461197-1122319506554/What_is_the_Monterrey_Consensus.pdf.
  10. Blampied C. Where next for development effectiveness? Building a renewed consensus, in 2016 CAPE Conference. London: ODI; 2016.
  11. Owa M. Is OECD DAC's aid effectiveness agenda based on evidence? Journal of Development Effectiveness.  2015;7:435-444. doi:10.1080/19439342.2015.1098719
  12. Wood B, Betts J, Etta F, et al. The Evaluation of the Paris Declaration, Final Report (Phase 2). Copenhagen: Danish Institute for International Studies; 2011.
  13. Martinez-Alvarez M, Acharya A, Arregoces L, et al. Trends In the alignment and harmonization of reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health funding, 2008-13. Health Aff (Millwood). 2017;36:1876-1886. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0364
  14. Micah AE, Zlavog B, Friedman S, et al. The US provided $13 billion in development assistance for health in 2016, less per person than many peer nations. Health Aff (Millwood). 2017;36(12):2133-2141. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1055
  15. Murphy F. Rise of a new superpower: health and China’s global
    trade ambitions. BMJ  2018;360:k595. doi:10.1136/bmj.k595
  16. 16.              Boosting South-South Cooperation in the Context of Aid Effectiveness. Task Team on South-South Cooperation, 2010. https://www.oecd.org/dac/effectiveness/46080462.pdf.
  17. Yamey G, Gonzalez D, Bharali I, Flanagan K, Hecht R. Transitioning from Foreign Aid: Is the Next Cohort of Graduating Countries Ready? The Center for Policy Impact in Global Health and Pharos Global Health Advisors Working Paper, March 2018. http://centerforpolicyimpact.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2018/03/Transition-from-foreign-aid_DukeCPIGH-Working-Paper-final.pdf
  18. Stenberg K, Hanssen O, Edejer TT, et al. Financing transformative health systems towards achievement of the health Sustainable Development Goals: a model for projected resource needs in 67 low-income and middle-income countries. Lancet Glob Health. 2017; 5(9):e875-e887. doi:10.1016/S2214-109X(17)30263-2
  19. De Los Reyes C. Nontraditional donors changing face of international aid. Devex. August 11, 2011. https://www.devex.com/news/nontraditional-donors-changing-face-of-international-aid-75598
  20. Prizzon A. Where next for development effectiveness? Situating the debate in the country perspective. Presented in: 2016 CAPE Conference. London: ODI; 2016.