Calls for Stricter Legislation and Fear in the European Immigrant Community: Reflections of the Public Charge Debate Ongoing in the United States; Comment on “A Crisis of Humanitarianism: Refugees at the Gates of Europe”

Document Type: Commentary

Author

Cooperative Studies Program Epidemiology Center, Health Services Research and Development, DVAHCS (Duke Affiliate), Durham, NC, USA

Abstract

In the editorial, “A Crisis of Humanitarianism: Refugees at the Gates of Europe,” Marianna Fotaki elegantly highlights the changing dynamics of governmental policy toward refugees, forced migrants into Europe and the move away from the principles of humanitarianism.1 The perceived threats to economy, security, and concerns of globalization and multiculturalism often are manifested as a “cry of wolf ” about alleged health risks. This in effect has raised concerns of inadmissibility on health-related grounds and calls for stricter legislation for determining who is eligible for legal permanent residence, precipitated in part by the “public charge” debate occurring in the United States.2 As Marianna notes “anti-migration rhetoric is now a permanent fixture of European politics.”

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