Developing a Research Agenda for the Analysis of Product Supply: A Response to the Recent Commentaries

Document Type: Correspondence

Authors

1 School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

2 Menzies Centre for Health Policy, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Keywords


We read the responses to our paper “How Neoliberalism Is Shaping the Supply of Unhealthy Commodities and What This Means for NCD Prevention1 with great interest. The different disciplinary perspectives expanded and deepened our analysis of the relationship between neoliberalism and the supply of unhealthy commodities. Our effort to articulate the role of ideas, specifically the category of ideas associated with the neoliberal paradigm, and the relationship to institutions that in turn shape product supply, is to point to one aspect of the system that is often neglected, that of policy paradigms... (Read more...)

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