“A Promise Unfulfilled”: Stakeholder Influence and the 2018 UN High-Level Meeting on NCDs; Comment on "Competing Frames in Global Health Governance: an Analysis of Stakeholder Influence on the Political Declaration on Non-Communicable Diseases

Document Type : Commentary

Author

World Obesity Federation, London, UK

Abstract

In recognition of the global burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), the past decade has seen three U.N. High Level Meetings on NCDs. Yet progress in terms of political or financial commitments has been very slow. At the 2018 meeting, a political declaration was approved but featured language that had been watered down in terms of commitments. In "Competing Frames of Global Health Governance: An Analysis of Stakeholder Influence on the Political Declaration on Non-communicable Diseases," Suzuki et al analyze the documents that were submitted by Member States, NGOs and the private sector during the consultation period and conclude that the private sector and several high-income countries appeared to oppose regulatory frameworks for products associated with NCDs , that wealthier countries resisted financing commitments, and that general power asymmetries affected the final document. This comment supports their findings and provides additional considerations for why the NCD response has yet to produce significant commitments.

Keywords


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Articles in Press, Accepted Manuscript
Available Online from 03 October 2021
  • Receive Date: 22 July 2021
  • Revise Date: 28 September 2021
  • Accept Date: 02 October 2021