The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy

Document Type: Editorial

Authors

1 School of Health and Human Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, UK

2 Health Services Management Center, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed the rise of populism and populist leaders, movements and policies in many pluralist liberal democracies, with Brexit and the election of Trump the two most recent high profile examples of this backlash against established political elites and the institutions that support them. This new populism is underpinned by a post-truth politics which is using social media as a mouthpiece for ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts’ with the intention of inciting fear and hatred of ‘the other’ and thereby helping to justify discriminatory health policies for marginalised groups. In this article, we explore what is meant by populism and highlight some of the challenges for health and health policy posed by the new wave of post-truth populism.

Highlights

Commentaries Published on this Paper

  • “Enemies of the People?” Public Health in the Era of Populist Politics; Comment on “The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy”

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  • “Stop, You’re Killing us!” An Alternative Take on Populism and Public Health; Comment on “The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy”

          Abstract  | PDF

  • This Is My (Post) Truth, Tell Me Yours; Comment on “The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy”

          Abstract | PDF

  • Populism, Exclusion, Post-truth. Some Conceptual Caveats; Comment on “The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy”

          Abstract | PDF

  • Community Psychology as a Process of Citizen Participation in Health Policy; Comment on “The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy”

          Abstract | PDF

  • The Far Right Challenge; Comment on “The Rise of Post-truth Populism in Pluralist Liberal Democracies: Challenges for Health Policy”

          Abstract | PDF

 

Authors' Response to the Commentaries

  • The Politics and Power of Populism: A Response to the Recent Commentaries

          Abstract | PDF

Keywords

Main Subjects


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