False Dawns and New Horizons in Patient Safety Research and Practice

Document Type: Editorial

Authors

1 Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

2 Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Abstract

In response to a weight of evidence that patients are frequently harmed as a result of their care, there have been concerted efforts to make healthcare safer, with health systems across the globe investing significant resources in policies and programmes designed to reduce adverse events. Yet, despite extensive efforts, improvements in safety have proved difficult to sustain and spread, with studies confirming there has been no measurable, systemslevel improvement in the overall rates of preventable harm. Here, we highlight the limitations of the thinking which underpins current efforts to make healthcare systems safer and point to new and emerging approaches to understanding and addressing patient safety in complex, dynamic health systems.

Highlights

Commentaries Published on this Paper

  • It Ain’t What You Do (But the Way That You Do It): Will Safety II Transform the Way We Do Patient Safety; Comment on “False Dawns and New Horizons in Patient Safety Research and Practice”

          Abstract | PDF

  • A Safety-II Perspective on Organisational Learning in Healthcare Organisations; Comment on “False Dawns and New Horizons in Patient Safety Research and Practice”

          Abstract | PDF

  • The Rise of Patient Safety-II: Should We Give Up Hope on Safety-I and Extracting Value From Patient Safety Incidents?; Comment on “False Dawns and New Horizons in Patient Safety Research and Practice”

          Abstract | PDF

  • Safety I to Safety II: A Paradigm Shift or More Work as Imagined?; Comment on “False Dawns and New Horizons in Patient Safety Research and Practice”

          Abstract | PDF

  • Disturbing the Doxa of Patient Safety; Comment on “False Dawns and New Horizons in Patient Safety Research and Practice”

          Abstract | PDF

 

Authors' Response to the Commentaries

  • Where is Patient Safety Research and Practice Heading? A Response to Recent Commentaries

          Abstract | PDF

Keywords

Main Subjects


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